“THE GLUE THAT HOLDS THE WORLD TOGETHER” KID PRESIDENT IS TELLING YOU WHY!

HumanSinShadow.wordpress.com

 A real great message for all FABULOUS MOMS. 
This is especially appropriate with Mother’s Day coming up.
I call Mothers  THE GLUE THAT HOLDS THE WORLD TOGETHER.   I did not borrow that from anywhere; that came right from my brain.
Did you notice that MOM upside down is WOW.

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Lebanon’s refugee schools provide hope for Syria’s lost generation

CHILDREN IN SHADOW ::: CHILDREN IN WAR

Lebanon’s refugee schools provide hope for Syria’s lost generation

‘Despite the suffering, children have an amazing ability to recover,’ says Unicef as some of the 400,000 child refugees in Lebanon begin to receive education
Lebanon refugee school
Khaled al Aali, 40, from Homs, Syria, teaches art to children who live in nearby refugee settlements near Zahle in the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. Photograph: Sam Tarling for the Guardian

Each morning at 8am, Ahmed stirs from his blanket on the soil and walks about a mile to the morning shift. Sometimes his two sisters go with him. More children soon join him from nearby potato fields and tents, on their way to the first of the day’s three school sessions. A second wave of small children carrying oversized blue school bags appears at noon, and another in the late afternoon.

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Witness: Lack of Support in Japanese Orphanages

CHILDREN IN SHADOW ::: CHILDREN IN WAR

japan0514_reportcoverPress
Amy Braunschweiger

Witness: Lack of Support in Japanese Orphanages

May 1, 2014

Beds in sleeping quarters for elementary school girls at a child care institution in Iwate prefecture. Eight girls share a room, and the space on their own bed is the only place children are allowed some privacy. Even such privacy is guaranteed only by a simple curtain surrounding each bed, August 2012.

© 2012 Sayo Saruta/Human Rights Watch

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Our Report:

Without Dreams

Children in Alternative Care in Japan
May 1, 2014
Masashi Suzuki sat in the quiet upstairs level of the McDonald’s in a Tokyo suburb. The restaurant was bright and cheerful, but Masashi’s expression was somber. His parents abandoned him as a baby, he said slowly, in a listless voice. From age 2 he lived in agovernment-funded institution in Funabashi, Chiba prefecture, just south of Tokyo. He explained that he was released from the institution at…

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